Jordan Spieth says new drop rule is ‘like a frustrating asterisk’

Jordan Spieth is making his 2019 debut at the Sony Open this week, which means his first exposure to golf’s new rules — and there’s at least one he’s not sold on.

“One that I don’t really understand necessarily is the drop,” Spieth told reporters. Under the new rules, players must drop from knee height, rather than shoulder height, which led to a series of awkward visuals at last week’s Tournament of Champions.

“You drop it knee height, but like, what’s the advantage of dropping it shoulder height? It’s actually probably a disadvantage, so why can’t you still do that? You should be able to drop it from shoulder to knee height in my opinion. It doesn’t do any good and honestly it’s like, a frustrating asterisk that I have to re-pick it up and re-drop from your knee.”

Spieth Skeptical rule

Spieth isn’t sold on golf’s new rules on dropping.

While players have generally reacted well to the rules changes, Spieth is not alone in his criticism of the drop protocol. Bryson DeChambeau had a similar reaction at last week’s Tournament of Champions. “I think the knee-drop one. That you have to drop it from knee height is a bit absurd, unfortunately,” he said.

Rory McIlroy added his skepticism. “We’re saying that Brian Harman has got a big advantage, he can basically place it. Where you have someone like Tony Finau who is dropping it probably from like, waist-high for me.”

Spieth added that he doesn’t expect everyday golfers to take the new drop rule seriously. “What if they just take a drop from the cart path. I don’t think they probably care. They will still drop it from the shoulder. Technically, you take a drop from your shoulder and play out, you could be penalized for that. Doesn’t make much sense.

“It’s a disadvantage to drop it that high, so that one I didn’t really understand fully. It was cool that you’re able to get lower to drop it. I thought you would be able to do it at any height.”

Spieth tees off No. 10 at 8 a.m. on Thursday alongside DeChambeau and Gary Woodland.