6 things you can buy at your local drugstore to improve your game

August 2, 2019

Sometimes, finding creative tools to help improve your golf game means looking in places you wouldn’t normally consider. Case in point—your local drugstore.

Here are six things you can pick up next time you’re out running errands, wishing you were instead playing golf or out on the practice tee working on your golf game.


Foot Spray

By now, you probably know that foot powder spray works wonders for checking where the golf ball is impacting the clubface. We’ve found that not only is it useful on the practice tee, it’s great for chipping and putting, too. And for errrr….athlete’s foot.


New Insoles

Golf shoes take a lot of abuse during the course of play, and the leathers and fabrics will likely stretch over time. A new cushioned insole can help cozy up your feet and prevent slipping, while also adding some welcomed cushioning.


Tite Grip

Got sweaty paws? Sometimes on hot and humid days, wearing a glove doesn’t do enough to keep the sweat off your grips. Using a hand drying lotion can definitely help, but be warned. It feels weird. And sometimes it’s hard to wash off.


Gauze Tape

Need to add some traction to your putting grip but don’t have time to swap in a new handle? Adhesive tape, or gauze tape, has been used predominantly on putter grips for years (think of veterans like Scott Verplank and Justin Leonard—both have opted for taped up grips during their respective careers) and can add a dose of tackiness to an already worn out grip. And yes, it’s allowed under the Rules of Golf.


Rubber Bands

This is a great one for dialing in your impact with your putter. Take two rubber bands, and wrap them around the sweetspot of your putter. Hit a few putts and you’ll know immediately if you’re hitting your putts solidly or not. Take them off when you’re ready to go play.


A Doorstopper

A doorstopper can help you reduce swaying on your backswing. Simply wedge one underneath the middle of you your back/trailing foot, with the thick end of the doorstop outside your foot. As you swing, you’ll feel the doorstop preventing you from rolling or sliding your weight outside your foot.