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Johnny Miller: Learn My Best Swing Tip Ever

I feel sorry for players who struggle with swing mechanics -- they never get to enjoy the game to its fullest. Sure, playing golf is fun even when you're not hitting it great, but imagine the thrill of maneuvering the ball into perfect position on every swing and not worrying about the next big miss. I assure you, it's magic.

Even if you have more than a few things wrong with your technique, I'll bet I can solve a bunch of them with one easy tip. I have dozens of fixes, and this one is near the top of the list. I've seen it work on golfers of all levels, from high-handicappers with chronic slices to the pros I played against. Heck, I use it when my own swing falls off track. It's about positioning your left shoulder so that you catch the ball first and the ground second when swinging an iron.

Here's how it works.

STEP 1: Take your normal address. Note the position of your left shoulder and burn it into your mind's eye.

STEP 2: Swing the club back. Regardless of whether you make a big or little turn, or a wide or narrow arm swing, your left shoulder will move out of the position it was in at setup -- and this shoulder movement is perfectly okay. Ideally, your shoulder should move under your chin, but that's not critical.

STEP 3: Here's the important part. As you swing down, concentrate on returning your left shoulder to its starting position. I don't care how you do it -- just do it.

Returning your left shoulder at impact to its address position does two things: First, it gives you clean contact, allowing you to trap the ball between the turf and the clubface. Second, it stops you from "hanging back" on your right side, or doing what I call the "sway and stay." Swaying and staying is a high-handicap move that produces slices and hooks in equal amounts.

Here's a helpful hint for the all-important Step 3. Picture a knife pointed at the outside of your left shoulder at address. Don't overdo the move to the point where the Knife plunges deep into your shoulder -- just do it enough to feel a little puncture. In other words, cut your shoulder, not the ball.

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