Tiger Woods’s Jupiter Island Practice Facility

1 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
Tiger Woods had long hoped to have his own practice facility to hone his short- and mid-range game. When he purchased property on Jupiter Island in 2006, he decided to make his dream facility a reality. Once he began thinking through the design, he did it with one goal in mind: to replicate tournament-level playing scenarios, similar to those he has faced on courses all over the world.
2 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
Tiger started with the flat, 3.5-acre area and with the help of the Tiger Woods Design team, he directed the layout and shaping of this family-friendly practice facility.
3 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
The result is 3.5 acres of tournament-conditioned turf and bunkering to re-create the look, feel and playability of various major courses.
4 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
Tiger also designed the four greens complexes and surrounds to provide many different opportunities to work on a variety of putting and recovery shots. Each green has a unique contouring to create many options to practice long, short, straight and breaking putts.
5 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
The green surrounds have been shaped with subtle contours and strategically placed swales. Woods chose different grass types, varied grass lines, and employed multiple heights of cut in the design of these surrounds to simulate authentic on-course situations.
6 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
Shorter cuts with firm and fast conditions allow the practice of many different shots, including bump and runs, traditional and non-traditional pitches and putting from off the green; higher cuts with softer conditions allow for more aerial shots from tough lies.
7 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
Tiger designed each greens complex with a different style of bunker, and the bunkers themselves are filled with different types of sand specifically chosen to replicate what might be faced at major tournament venues around the world.
8 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
All greens are equipped to use SubAir, which moves air through the green profile to improve maintenance conditions. One green uses hydronics, which is a tubing system that heats or cools the temperature of the green and can be used as an aid to improve ground conditions during extreme weather.
9 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
The Jupiter Island practice course was designed and built to take advantage of a surplus of unused brackish water.
10 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
This non-potable brackish water is pumped from over 1,200 feet below the surface and filtered through an on-site reverse osmosis plant, which in turn makes the water safe for turf grasses and landscape materials. This feature will save millions of gallons of water a year.
11 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
12 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design
13 of 13 Courtesy of Tiger Woods Design