Annika Sorenstam – Swing Sequence

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Swing Sequence: Annika Sorenstam She's called it a career, but her swing remains the blueprint for adding consistency to your game Analysis by Top 100 Teacher Brady Riggs If you want to improve your swing by stealing a few moves from the pro ranks, some of the easiest to copy are the nearly fault-free mechanics of the recently retired Annika Sorenstam. During her best years, she was very long, and even more accurate. Hers was a swing built on simplicity and consistency — basic moves that always got the job done. Pay attention to the clean lines created by her body and clubshaft — they never stray from what most instructors would call "perfect." Despite her rock-solid fundamentals, most people focus on her one idiosyncrasy: her head movement through impact. But even that is a solid move to mimic. Rotating your head like Annika does is an effective way to improve your ballstriking. She's hung up her spikes, but Sorenstam will be regarded as one of the greatest players in history — male or female — and owner of a swing that most of us should emulate.
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Annika's setup is relaxed, with her arms hanging naturally and her chin raised off her sternum (but not pushed out). Her knees are flexed out over her toes, keeping her weight away from her heels. Solid. Annika's setup is relaxed, with her arms hanging naturally and her chin raised off her sternum (but not pushed out). Her knees are flexed out over her toes, keeping her weight away from her heels. Solid.
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Unlike most swings on the PGA Tour, Annika rotates everything (arms, hips, shoulders, chest, club) away from the ball at the same time. This is the simplest way to keep your club on plane at the start.
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Annika swings "uni-plane" — the shaft angle barely changes from setup. Hard to go wrong from here. Try to get your right upper arm parallel to the ground and your right forearm parallel to your spine at the top.
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The "uni-plane" theme continues: The shaft angle in her downswing is a near carbon copy of her backswing. The only difference is the flex in her legs — a response to a shift in weight to her left side.
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Classic: Hips more open than her shoulders, weight on her left heel and clubshaft leaning toward the target. Neo-classic: The release of her eyes and chin (much like Robert Allenby and Darren Clarke, among others).
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Try to copy the vertical arrangement of her right side, which you can only do if you turn your right side all the way through. This is a fantastic swing thought — it encourages a full finish and discourages quitting on the shot.
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A: The Halo: Notice how Annika's spine and shoulders form a "T." This is a huge key for hitting straight shots. Build the "T" by keeping your chin in line with your sternum as you turn through impact. Feel like you're wearing a neck brace or "halo." Your rhythm and consistency will improve in an instant. B: The Trademark: In traditional swings, the head stops moving during impact, which can force the hands to take over and move the club offline or manipulate the clubface. Annika's early head release keeps her hands passive, a critical key to playing under pressure. C: The Space: Annika's fantastic path into the ball allows her to "let go" through impact. There's no holding or steering the club. When combined with a flawless path, this creates space between her hands and her body, and this space means extra power. How to hit consistent shots: If there's one thing to take away from Annika's swing, it's the complete lack of strain she places on her body. It's a by-product of her trademark move: rotating her head and eyes toward the target through impact. This early release allows her shoulders to rotate through the hitting area on a flatter plane with a minimum of side tilt (resulting in the vertical right side in Frame 6). If you're a chronic slicer, this is the move for you.