The New British Open Rota

1 of 10 No. 8 at Royal Portrush / Kevin Murray
10. Royal Portrush (Dunluce), Portrush, Northern Ireland; Opens: 1951, (2019) The only Irish course ever to host an Open is perennially ranked in the world’s Top 15 courses, thanks to a superior H.S. Colt design in 1929 that maximizes its setting in high dunes along the Irish Sea. Max Faulkner took the only Open held here. For 2019, we like Rory McIlroy’s chances. After all, he set the course record here, 61, as a 16-year-old.
2 of 10 No. 4 at Royal Lytham & St. Annes (David Cannon / Getty Images)
9. Royal Lytham & St. Annes, Lytham St. Annes, England; Opens: 1926, 1952, 1958, 1963, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1988, 1996, 2001, 2012 Roughly 200 bunkers menace this rugged links. One of them in particular, in the left-center of the 18th fairway, cost Adam Scott the 2012 Open. There are no views of the sea here, but the wind and vegetation shout “seaside.” Best of all at Lytham was Spaniard Seve Ballesteros, who won here in 1979 and 1988.
3 of 10 No. 14 at Royal Liverpool (David Cannon / Getty Images)
8. Royal Liverpool, Hoylake, England; Opens: 1897, 1902, 1907, 1913, 1924, 1930, 1936, 1947, 1956, 1967, 2006 (2014) Hoylake, as the club is popularly known, jumped back on the rota in 2006, after a 39-year hiatus, and witnessed a parched layout conquered by Tiger Woods, who parleyed his long irons and course management skills into a second straight Open win. Yet, this flattish course, with its quirky internal out-of-bounds, is best known as the venue for Bobby Jones’ Open win in his Grand Slam year of 1930.
4 of 10 No. 3 at Royal Birkdale (Mark Newcombe / Visions In Golf)
7. Royal Birkdale, Southport, England; Opens: 1954, 1961, 1965, 1971, 1976, 1983, 1991, 1998, 2008 Praised by competitors as the fairest Open venue, Birkdale rolls through the Lancashire Coast with valley-type holes that run between the dunes, rather than up and over them. Arnold Palmer’s strength and superb driving saw him through in the stormy 1961 event, while Johnny Miller’s precise iron play brought him home during the dry, dusty 1976 tournament.
5 of 10 No. 9 at Royal St. George's / Eric Hepworth
6. Royal St. George’s, Sandwich, England; Opens: 1894, 1899, 1904, 1911, 1922, 1928, 1934, 1938, 1949, 1981, 1985, 1993, 2003, 2011 The first course outside of Scotland to host the Open, this 127-year-old links on the Kentish coast heaves with the grandest sand hills of all Open venues, and offers the most blind shots as well. At age 42, Darren Clarke outdueled Phil Mickelson and Dustin Johnson to capture the 2011 event, but its greatest staging was in 1993, when Greg Norman shot 64 in the final round to nip Nick Faldo and Bernhard Langer.
6 of 10 No. 10 at Turnberry (David Cannon / Getty Images)
5. Turnberry (Ailsa), Turnberry, Scotland; Opens: 1977, 1986, 1994, 2009Venue for Tom Watson’s greatest triumph and most tragic disaster, Turnberry dates to 1909, but saw its fairways converted to airfield runways during World War II. Architect P. Mackenzie Ross rebuilt it in 1951 and its seaside splendor is now in the hands of new owner Donald Trump. Watson’s “Duel in the Sun” victory over Nicklaus in 1977 shattered all scoring records.
7 of 10 No. 18 at Carnoustie (Andrew Redington / Getty Images)
4. Carnoustie (Championship), Carnoustie, Scotland; Opens: 1931, 1937, 1953, 1968, 1975, 1999, 2007 Dubbed “Car-nasty” during the 1999 Open, where skinny fairways and jungle-like rough induced a winning score of 290 (+6), this ancient links dates in part to 1842. Ben Hogan captured the Claret Jug here in 1953, his only appearance in the Open.
8 of 10 No. 8 at Royal Troon (David Cannon / Getty Images)
3. Royal Troon (Old), Troon, Scotland; Opens: 1923, 1950, 1962, 1973, 1982, 1989, 1997, 2004 (2016) Troon might be best known for its “Postage Stamp” par-3 8th, the shortest hole in Open golf at 123 yards that was aced in the 1973 Open by 71-year-old Gene Sarazen. Arnold Palmer set an Open record with his win in 1962, at 276, a mark later tied by Tom Weiskopf -- again at Troon -- in 1973.
9 of 10 David Cannon / Getty Images
2. Muirfield, Gullane, Scotland; Opens: 1892, 1896, 1901, 1906, 1912, 1929, 1935, 1948, 1959, 1966, 1972, 1980, 1987, 1992, 2002, 2013Golf’s oldest club, the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers, has hosted Opens for more than a century, though its current course is an H.S. Colt design that dates only to 1925. Jack Nicklaus, winner here in 1966, was so impressed by its fairness and challenge that he named his own major-worthy course in Ohio after it.
10 of 10 No. 14 at St. Andrews (David Cannon / Getty Images)
1. St. Andrews (Old Course), St. Andrews, Scotland; Opens: 1873, 1876, 1879, 1882, 1885, 1888, 1891, 1895, 1900, 1905, 1910, 1921, 1927, 1933, 1939, 1946, 1955, 1957, 1960, 1964, 1970, 1978, 1984, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010 (2015) The home of golf features the oldest course on earth in all of its quirky glory. Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods have won two Opens apiece here. Tweaks and refinements are a constant at St. Andrews, but essentially, the Old Course plays as it did 150 years ago.