U.S. Open 2019: These 6 pros have dominated Pebble Beach

June 12, 2019

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — The site of this week’s U.S. Open is a track we all know well — it’s Pebble Beach, which we get to watch the best players in the world take on every year.

This year, there’s double the pleasure as we’ve got the Open taking place just four months after the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. The latter is a popular stop on Tour, especially by those who play it best. But how will that mood change for an event in June?

Phil Mickelson won the Pro-Am in February and has admitted himself that the course will play differently in the summer. Jordan Spieth, another former AT&T champ, has said the same. Either way, for those who play it well in February, there is at least some expectation that success can translate (even though two of the four rounds of the Pro-Am aren’t at Pebble Beach). If it does, these men should be included among the favorites. Here are six players in the field who have dominated Pebble Beach over the years.

Phil Mickelson

Need we say anymore? No player in the history of the game has won more money at Pebble Beach than Mickelson’s career total of $7.28 million. The next most is more than $2.5 million away, so no one will be taking him off the top spot anytime soon, even with a win this week. Lefty has won the Pro-Am five times, and he even finished T4 at the 2010 U.S. Open here.

Jason Day

Day was somehow never won the Pro-Am, but he has played well every time, making 10 cuts in 10 tries. Beyond those cuts, his final round scoring average has come out to a filthy 69.125.

Dustin Johnson

Not only did DJ win the 2009 Pro-Am, he backed it up by repeating in 2010. He nearly followed that up with the 2010 U.S. Open title, but his big lead entering the final round was surrendered via a Sunday 82. In total, DJ has amassed more than $4 million in career earnings at Pebble Beach.

Brandt Snedeker

Sneds is another two-time champion at the Pro-Am, and he sports a 69.875 final-round average at Pebble. While he’s missed the cut four times in his 12 tries, he also finished T8 at the 2010 Open.

Jordan Spieth

Might this be the time that Spieth returns to the major championship circle? He was the best in the field at the Pro-Am in 2017, and while he didn’t fare well at Pebble earlier this year, his recent form makes you think those two rounds were an aberration.

Jim Furyk

A wily U.S. Open vet, Furyk has played the Pro-Am 22 times, making the cut in 19 of those tournaments. His final-round scoring average at Pebble has been a solid 71.5, coupled with a solid T16 finish at the 2010 Open.