Some of the best chippers in history do these two things for extra-crisp chips

February 20, 2019
AUGUSTA, GA - APRIL 1983: Seve Ballesteros chips to the green during the 1983 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club in April 1983 in Augusta, Georgia. (Photo by Augusta National/Getty Images)

Top Teacher Andrew Rice has two thoughts to help your improve your chipping strike: Rotate and Rise.

You probably think “staying down” is a good idea when hitting chip shots. It’s not. Staying down limits rotation and alters the radius of your swing, which has an adverse effect on strike quality. When it comes to short shots, strike is king.

Study the best chippers in history—players like Seve Ballesteros and José María Olazábal—and you’ll notice they shift pressure forward onto their front foot during the backswing. This positions the body for the proper descending strike. In the downswing, they elevate or stand up slightly through impact.

This might go against the grain, but getting “taller” in your downswing will encourage your chest to rotate through impact—an important element of a crisp chip strike. During practice, work to coordinate a subtle shift forward followed by a gentle rise through impact. Your swing thought: Rotate and Rise. Do that, and you’ll lift to your up-and-down percentage. — Andrew Rice

Andrew Rice, Chipping at Coach Camp at The Club at Savannah Harbor, Savannah, GA, USA. Credit: Christopher Sturman