Tiger Woods Falls Down at Chambers Bay

Tiger Woods Falls Down at Chambers Bay

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Tiger Woods Courses took drastic efforts to prevent themselves from becoming obsolete due to Tiger’s ability to hit the ball longer than anyone on Tour. Even though he’s been surpassed in driving distance in the recent years, the “Tiger-proofing” of layouts across the Tour stops provides evidence that Tiger was one of a kind in the late ‘90s. Augusta National notably stretched its layout by more than 500 yards in 1997 after Tiger lapped the field en route to a 12-stroke victory.
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I will never be able to unsee Tiger Woods falling on his ass at Chambers Bay.

He did so figuratively in the first round when he shot an 80 that included eight bogeys, a triple and a duffer’s topped fairway-wood shot.

In the second round he took a literal tumble. On his opening hole Woods yanked his approach shot halfway up a Mount Kilimanjaro-like dune. As he sized up the ensuing awkward pitch, he slipped and fell on his rear end. Tiger was fine but the Internet-viral moment dripped with symbolism.

Add his dismal 16-over-par effort at Chambers Bay to the 82 and chip-yips in Phoenix, the Torrey Pines first-round walk-off and the 85 at Memorial and—yikes—this is not The Year of the Tiger.

Once upon a time, Tiger hit at least one shot every tournament that seemed humanly impossible, or he did something I’d never seen, from the bunker shot over the lake to win the 2000 Canadian Open, to the 7-iron from the rough onto Pebble Beach’s sixth green at the 2000 Open to…well, Tiger’s greatest hits list is long and wonderful.

Last week, Tiger Woods figuratively fell and couldn’t get up. I almost wish I hadn’t seen it.

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