Rogue Two: These Callaway iron siblings both pack power and forgiveness

Rogue Two: These Callaway iron siblings both pack power and forgiveness

The Callaway Rogue iron and the Callaway Rogue X iron.
The Callaway Rogue iron (bottom) and the Callaway Rogue X iron.
Courtesy of Callaway

Manufacturers understand that one iron won’t suit all players, which explains why you see multiple head offerings in the same line. Case in point: the Callaway Rogue family. Here, the choice is simple: Rogue is for those who want the ideal balance of game-improving distance and forgiveness, while Rogue X is for players who want the same forgiveness with maximum distance.

“The Rogue X is a whole new category for us,” says Dave Neville, Callaway senior director, brand and product management. “The standard Rogue might be the biggest-selling iron out there, but the Rogue X is the longest.” Take a look at both to see which one is right for your mindset and game.

Callaway's Rogue X irons

Callaway’s Rogue X irons are for players who want the same forgiveness with maximum distance

LONG AND STRONG

The X lofts are jacked, but CG locations are altered to maximize launch and spin via strategically located tungsten weights. If you’re worried about too little spin or launch, Callaway has you covered.

PLAYER FRIENDLY

The X is built with a wider sole than the standard model for more forgiveness. A thicker topline builds confidence at address, while more offset makes solid contact a breeze.

FACE FACTS

Callaway’s 360 Face Cup and Variable Face Thickness (VFT) design maximize COR and ball speed across the entire clubface for maximum power.

The Callaway Rogue irons

The Callaway Rogue irons are for those who want the ideal balance of game-improving distance and forgiveness.

STRAIGHT SHOOTER

Those who favor a balance of accuracy and distance should pick the standard Rogue; shafts are slightly shorter and heavier than those on the X model, leading to more precision on approach shots.

LOOK SHARP

Slightly weaker lofts, thinner toplines, narrower soles and less o set are a good fit for players who prefer a more traditional look.

FEELING GROOVY

Thin clubfaces tend to sound and feel harsh, but both Rogues are fitted with urethane microspheres behind the face for a soft yet solid sensation.