The Club That Never Was: Nike’s VPR Strike driver surfaces on internet

These photos of the Nike VPR Strike driver were posted on Instagram by a former Nike Golf employee.
These photos of the Nike VPR Strike driver were posted on Instagram by a former Nike Golf employee.
Instagram: oli_willson13

If you’re on Instagram and into golf gear you probably saw a picture of the Nike VPR Strike driver recently, which according to multiple sources was scheduled for release in 2017.

Unfortunately for Nike Golf fans, the company ceased selling golf clubs in 2016, leaving the new driver in the proverbial dustbin. The photo evidently came from a former Nike Golf employee whose Instagram handle is oli_Wilson13, who also shared some further information on the driver with the folks at golfwrx.com.

 

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The @nikegolf driver that never was!! This was going to be the 2017 driver until they decided to exit the club & ball market #VaporStrike

A post shared by Oli Willson (@oli_willson13) on

According to the report, the VPR Strike represented a major advancement in performance over the previous Vapor Fly Pro model and produced up to 8 mph more ball speed and loads more distance.

Other interesting tidbits include Rory McIlroy’s supposed interest in playing the driver in the ’16 Open Championship and the potential marketing campaign that would call the club the “legal, illegal driver,” due to the fact that some areas of the clubface actually exceeded COR limits set by the USGA.

Here’s a view of the crown on the Nike VPR Strike driver that would have been released in 2017.

Unfortunately, attempts by GOLF.com to verify information on the VPR Strike from former Nike Golf R&D employees were unsuccessful, as they are not permitted to discuss the product.

For those that consider themselves hardcore Nike driver fans (if such a thing actually exists), the best advice is to check eBay regularly in hopes that a VPR Strike eventually shows up. Otherwise you can simply demo one of the top-notch models from one of the companies that still manufactures golf clubs like Callaway, TaylorMade, Ping, Cobra, or Srixon, to name a few.