3:23 | News
How To Survive The Anchoring Ban
By Kiley Bense
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Adam Scott may be hoping for a little bit of Bernhard Langer and Scott McCarron's magic as their play has inspired him to go back to a long putter.

"I don't know if it's just a coincidence or if they had just a really good year," said Scott, speaking to reporters at the Australian PGA, of Langer and McCarron, who ranked first and second, respectively, in putting average on the Champions tour last season. "Maybe they've found the best way to putt."

Scott, who told reporters he's making the switch, initially discarded his broomstick-style putter in 2016, and since then his putting actually improved. He ranked 157th in Strokes Gained Putting in 2015, 129th in 2016 and 89th in 2017. But Scott's 2016-17 season was lackluster in other ways (his place in the OWGR dropped from 7th to 31st), and putting has never been the Australian's strength, so that may be why he's game to try something new.

"It feels good," he said. "It's just like when you pick up a new putter and you just hole putts; that's what it feels like."

Langer's stunning 2016-17 Champions tour season included seven wins, 16 top 10s and more than $3 million in winnings. Some, like Golf Channel analyst Brandel Chamblee and former Tiger Woods coach Hank Haney, have publicly questioned whether Langer and McCarron's methods are legal. A handful of players had to adjust their putting styles after the USGA's anchoring ban went into effect in January 2016. Langer and McCarron kept the long putter but held it a few inches from their bodies.

Adam Scott putts on the 8th green during Saturday foursome matches of the Presidents Cup at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J.
Getty Images

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