TaylorMade wins first round in PXG lawsuit

Saturday September 16th, 2017
4:53 | Tour & News
A Round With Bob Parsons
The founder of Parson's Xtreme Golf talks about his other business successes, who inspires him, and how the Marine Corps helped shape his life.

Judge John J. Tuchi denied PXG’s request for a temporary restraining order (TRO) on Friday afternoon, temporarily slowing the company’s efforts to stop the sale of TaylorMade’s new P790 irons.

Bob Parsons, the founder of Parsons Xtreme Golf (PXG), announced his lawsuit against TaylorMade on Tuesday, alleging the P790s “infringe upon many PXG patents,” and his lawyers filed for a TRO to halt their sale. While the judge’s ruling cited no specifics, and TaylorMade’s court defense remains sealed to protect the company’s proprietary information, a TaylorMade spokesperson praised the ruling Friday evening.

PXG contends that TaylorMade's P790 irons copy its patent-protected designs.
Courtesy of PXG

“While TaylorMade respects the intellectual property rights of others, we will always defend ourselves vigorously when someone falsely accuses us of infringement,” read the statement from TaylorMade. “Our victory in court today re-affirms our confidence in our products and technologies, and reinforces the excitement and momentum we are experiencing with our P790 irons to date.”

PXG had no comment after the ruling, but it appears that the injunction against TaylorMade is only one part of PXG’s strategy to defend its 0311 irons. Company lawyers also filed complaints against four of the USA’s biggest golf retailers for patent infringements relating to selling the P790s. On Thursday, PXG sued Worldwide Golf, the parent company of golf retail brands including Edwin Watts and Roger Dunn, and followed that up with suits Friday against the PGA Tour Superstore, Golf Galaxy, and Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Tour & News
Inside PXG's patent suit against TaylorMade: What PXG must prove to win its case

According to GOLF’s legal analyst, Michael McCann, it could be quite some time before the case is resolved: “PXG's pending litigation follows a script that has played out many times before in golf,” he wrote. “Other golf companies, including Nike and Wilson Sporting Goods, have filed patent infringement cases over the years in which they have asserted that another company has sold clubs, balls or other golf equipment using patented designs. These cases sometimes take years to play out.”

The next round, a hearing on PXG's request for a preliminary injunction against the P790 irons, is scheduled for November 14.

Parsons has added some big names to PXG's client list since it launched in 2015.
Scott Council

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