Big numbers and low moments at the majors

David Duval made a 10 at the 2006 Masters.
Chris O'Meara/AP

Angel Cabrera's double-digit score on the par-3 sixth during Thursday's first round was ugly. But his big 1-0 certainly wasn't the highest or the most consequential one-hole score in major championship history. Here, a few other nasty numbers from years past.

\nDaly's frustrating swipe
At the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst, John Daly carded an 11 on the par-4 eighth hole after he hit his ball while it was still moving. After his ball trickled down the green for a second time, Daly smacked it into the fairway, pitched from there and 3-putted. The annoyed Daly said he took a swipe at his ball on purpose to send a message to the U.S.G.A. "They have too many unfair pins. It's frustrating," Daly said. "It's not worth it. This is my last U.S. Open — ever." (Daly was back at the Open the next year.)

\nCasper's memorable farewell
It certainly was unforgettable, but for all the wrong reasons. In his final Masters in 2005, 1970 champ Billy Casper hit five balls in the water and 3-putted to make 14 on the par-3 16th. It was the worst score ever posted during the Masters on any one hole at Augusta, beating Tommy Nakajima's 13 in 1978. "The score doesn't mean anything," the 73-year-old Casper said. "I couldn't make a swing, but I just wanted to do it one more time." His final score? A record-setting 106, which included a monstrous 57 on the back. "I started out with six balls and then thought I'd better take a dozen," he said.

\nFrank Dobbs' dozen
Club Med Assistant Pro Frank Dobbs managed to make the cut at the 2000 PGA Championship at Valhalla. His prize? A third-round 88, which included a 12 at the par-4 13th. After knocking his drive into the right rough, Dobbs hit four balls into a creek surrounding the island green. The only club pro in the field had better luck on Sunday, reaching the green in regulation. "I can hit the green!" he exclaimed, to an ovation from the gallery. "If that awful round is the worst thing that ever happens to me, I'm in pretty good shape."

\nRocco's rocky finish
Walking to his ball in the 11th fairway, Rocco Mediate was in striking distance of catching Sunday's leader, Phil Mickelson, in the 2006 Masters. Instead, he hit three consecutive dunks into Rae's Creek. He finally knocked one over, but he found a bunker on his way to a 10. In one hole, Mediate went from three under and on the leaderboard to four over and on his way out. "My back went psycho," he said later. He finished his round with an 80, good enough for 36th place. "It's the best 71 holes I've ever played," he said.

\nDuval's double dose
In the 2006 Masters, David Duval found the creek on the left side of No. 2 fairway with his drive. He took a drop but hit two more shots in the creek on his way to a quintuple-bogey 10, which tied the record for the highest score on the hole. A few years before, Duval took a snowman on the Road Hole at the 2000 British Open after taking four shots to remove himself from a greenside pot bunker.

\nEls and Singh fade at Augusta
At the 2002 Masters, both Ernie Els and Vijay Singh were hanging around a few shots back from the final-round leader Tiger Woods. But on the par-4 13th, Els pulled his tee shot into the trees and then knocked his approach into Rae's Creek for an 8. After Els came Singh, who layed up at the par-5 15th but chunked a wedge into the pond in front of the green. He hit a second wedge in and ended up with a quadruple 9.

\nSnead's overly aggressive finish
Sam Snead walked up to the final hole at the 1939 U.S. Open needing a par to win the tourney. But Snead was under the impression that he needed a birdie, so he played with gusto. His drive found the rough, and he ended up hacking his way to a triple-bogey 8 and a tie for fifth. He later said that loss was the toughest of his career.

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