Monday, November 23, 2009

Tough time on the links this weekend? Top 100 Teacher Brady Riggs will beĀ online Tuesday at noon
EasternĀ to review your swing videos, answer questions and offer tips.
Be first in line by asking a question in the comments section below.

Thanks to everyone for your great questions and videos. Have a fantastic holiday weekend and I will see you next week on the blog. GO PACKERS!

Paul asks at 11:45:

I am single figure handicap but I always struggle with my driver. What
are some driver basics that I can work on at the range? Is width the
most important thing? I used to play a draw that turned into a snap
hook. So I steepened my swing slightly to play a fade but now I tend to
come over the top on certain occasions. Mostly though I just don't
trust my driver on the course and I end up with 100 swing thoughts
going through my head over the ball. What are some driver basics that I
can use to simplify my practice and my thoughts?

John asks at 11:35:

Brady, what are the best golf instruction books you can recommend?

Darren Smith asks at 11:25:

For me as a 7 handicapper, my most feared shot is the 30-50 yard bunker
shot. I am pretty good at playing out of a normal greenside bunker, but
with the slightly longer shot, I find it difficult to calibrate the
swing length, how much to open the face of my club, whether to use a
sand wedge or A-wedge, etc. I guess my uncertainty just comes from not
practicing that shot very often and also because a potentially bad shot
from this length can cost me extra shots on the scorecard.

Michael Mertz asks at 10:50:

What do you consider a normal allotted time for a foursome to complete 18 holes? Walking? Riding?
I had an incident on the course the other day and I am curious. There
were four of us at our local Muni. Two were walking, two were riding.
All of us are about 12-13 handicaps. We were playing at a good pace but
the foursome behind us were pushing us. We stayed in front but then
they started to get rude. We finished our round in 4 hours and 20
minutes but harsh words were exchanged in the parking lot. I felt they
were wrong.

Ron Gruver asks at 10:45:

I have golfed for many, many years. I have never had an official
handicap but if I were to guess I would say its in the range of 22 to
28. I base that on the PGA golf score tracking system. I consistently
two putt and do have probably 1 or two 3 putts. I generally have about
32 to 36 putts per round. My problem is that I'm trying to get into the
70's and I consistently mess up about 20 to 30 yards off the green. If
I'm laying three and about 30 yards and in 3"high rough you can count
on a 7. I simply cannot get out of these 3" high roughs properly. I use
my 9 iron from about 40 yards out and on low cut grass choosing pitch
and run and it works out, but if I'm in the 30 yard range and higher
rough its trouble with a capital T. Any suggestions?

John d asks at 10:25:

Brady, I'm told that, while I'm not quite 'casting', I'm not holding
the angle between the shaft and my forearms long enough. I've tried to
use various advise, such as practicing punch shots, but nothing seems
to help much. Actually the thing that has helped the most this year is
from the Jim Furyk article in the most recent Golf magazine wherein he
recommends moving the ball forward in the stance. Any thoughts?

I have watched people try to "Hold" the angle for 30 years and it never works. The first problem is that to achieve any angle at all you must be relaxed. The very notion of "holding" kills any chance of creating the "whip" you are looking for. To be totally honest, creating a harsh angle between the arm and clubshaft may be as bad as casting for the average player so be careful what you wish for.

To give you more pace and remove some of your "casting" issue you need to work on your change of direction. While keeping your arms and hands relaxed, make sure your weight ALWAYS PRECEDES your club. Here's what I mean. Like every other athletic motion your golf swing should have a flow to it. As your golf swing nears the top, your weight and body should take off towards the target while your club is still going back. Think of a pitcher on the mound, a tennis player hitting a serve, or a hockey player taking a slapshot. Speed is produced when your arms are caught between your body going to the target and your club going back to the top.

Forget about holding and work on your sequence, it will pay off.

Christian asks at 10:15:

Brady,

I noticed in the attached videos that I am dropping my lead shoulder
and moving my upper body towards the target at the beginning of the
downswing. I have stuggled with an out to in swing path for a while and
I think this is the cause. Do you have any suggestions for how I can
work on this? Do you see anything else in my swing that I should be
working on?

Face:

DTL:

Thanks,
Christian

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