Foley knocks Tiger's former coaches

Sean Foley isn't yet officially Tiger Woods's new swing coach — even if the two have done everything together short of trading Claddagh rings — but this much is obvious if and when Foley does get the nod: he won't be shy telling Tiger, and just about everybody else, exactly what's on his mind.
In a juicy interview with Fox Sports Robert Lusetich, Foley sounded off on a variety of topics, including the notion that Tiger should revert to his Butch Harmon-molded swing ("trying to go back to that would be a huge mistake"), Woods's recent form under Hank Haney's watch ("let’s be honest about this, it’s not like he was flushing it with Hank"); and why, as some have suggested, Foley is more than just a "flavor of the month" in teaching circles.    

“If I’m flavor of the month then I’ve been flavor of the month for 10 years,” he said. “I’m doing what I was supposed to do, I really
believe that.
“There’s a sense that this was what I was meant to do, and here I
am. But this is not fixing world hunger, this is getting people who are
already very good to hit a golf ball better.

“I suppose my point is that I’m not a guru, and I’m not some guy who (BS'd) his way to the top. I’m just who I am.”

He can say that again. As clock ticks, Pavin mulls picksIn five days U.S. Ryder Cup captain Corey Pavin will announce his four wildcard picks at the bastion of American capitalism, the New York Stock Exchange. Captain's picks are golf's version of an IPO — and it's uncertain how fans will receive Pavin's. Will they buy his selections? Or, as many Europeans have done with Monty's surprising picks, submit a rush of sell orders? Jeff Babineau of Golfweek considers the sure things:
The consensus is
that Tiger Woods, he being the No. 1 player in the world, and Zach
Johnson, he being a guy with a red-hot putter who seems to be rounding
into good form, are pretty much locks.
And the outliers:
Nick Watney? Sean O’Hair? Bo Van Pelt? Ricky Barnes? Ryan Palmer?
J.B. Holmes? A few hot days, a victory at Deutsche Bank, and who knows?
Winning in the playoffs certainly can upgrade a guy from “watch” to
“hot” in a hurry.
“Depending on who it is, it would give me pause, yes,” Pavin said Thursday.
No matter who Pavin picks, it will give golf fans and writers pause. (Rickie Fowler? C'mon! Dude hasn't won a single Tour event!!! Tiger Woods? You mean the guy who's 65th in FedEx points? Bo Van Pelt? Bo Van Who??? ) Earlier this week, my colleague Gary Van Sickle suggested that Pavin psych out the Euros by using only one of his picks. ("We don't need 12 men!" Pavin could bellow. "We'll beat 'em with nine!") Personally, I hope the U.S. captain does something even nuttier, like taking Jack Nicklaus or Michelle Wie or someone who plays more golf than both of them, President Obama. Then again, if Pavin wants a clutch putter, it'll be hard to overlook this stud. Tiger could face an awkward first: a big tournament, but no inviteShould Tiger Woods play lackluster golf at this week's Deutsche Bank Championship and fail to advance to the third round of the FedEx Cup playoffs, he will face yet another uncomfortable quandary in a year full of them. For the first time in his illustrious career, he will be on the outside of a Tour event looking in, notes the Boston Globe's Bob Ryan:   
The question was asked: Has he ever
been healthy, ready to go, eager to participate, and yet denied an
opportunity to play in a golf tournament?
“Not that I can recall, no,’’ he replied. “You’d have to do your research on that one.’’
Even as an amateur?
“Do your research,’’ he said. “I don’t know.’’
I’m not buying that, and neither should you. Tiger knows.
He is his own personal historian. Go ahead. Ask him what club he used
for his second shot on the third hole of the 1999 PGA at Medinah, or
how long the lag putt was on the first hole in the 2005 Open at St.
Andrews. He’ll know.
So the
answer to the question is n-o, no. Playing for his competitive life on
a week-to-week basis is an entirely new experience.
In other words, Round 3 at Cog Hill could feel a little like the NCAA tournament with no Tar Heels or baseball's playoffs without the Yankees. Odd. Buzz-less. Hollow even. It's an unlikely scenario, but in a season full of those, it would be an apt conclusion. Right, Louis Oosthuizen?     

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by Kevin Cunningham