News

Truth & Rumors: Rachel Uchitel clings to 14th minute of fame

Rachel Uchitel won't go awayIf you’ve been reading your tabs (like the good Truth & Rumors reader that you are), you already know that Rachel Uchitel—the most (in)famous of Tiger Woods’s alleged mistresses—will play a starring role in the next season of Celebrity Rehab, a VH1 show that follows D- and E- and F-listers as they try to kick their addictions to the likes of drugs, booze and fame. Various gossip rags have claimed that Uchitel is hooked on the sleeping pill Ambien, but it seems that nugget might have been (gasp!) misreported, according to The Hollywood Gossip.

Actually, she was never was addicted in the first place.
That's the rumor stemming from Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew, where sources close to the production say she never really had a pill-popping problem.
Instead, Rachel is getting "genuine treatment for emotional issues."
Whatever, who cares, right? Well, Tiger might. Here’s why
Sources claim that Rachel Uchitel is being paid a whopping $500,000 to appear on the reality show. She is already said to have checked into the Pasadena Recovery Center, where she will be encouraged to talk about her six-month affair with the golfer.
Oh, boy. This could get interesting ... again.Speaking of Tiger… Tiger has never liked to talk about his emotions. But that has never stopped Notah Begay from doing so for him. Call Begay the "Woods Whisperer." During a press conference at the Turning Stone Resort Championship in upstate New York, Begay was asked about the state of his old buddy’s game—and mind.
Notah Begay III, who shared a room with Woods when they were students at Stanford University, believes his good friend is close to his best but needs more time to balance his life away from the course.
"He's like anybody else," Begay told a news conference earlier this week for the PGA Tour's Turning Stone Resort Championship. "It's going to take some time for the emotions to settle and for him to sort of get 100 percent focused on golf.
"When somebody goes through a divorce, much less such a public one, it's going to be difficult to process what's going to happen, how they're going to cope and deal with things."
Although Woods has made his worst start on the PGA Tour in 12 years with regard to winning, Begay feels the world number one is not far from producing his customary tip-top form.

"He's hitting it as solid as I've ever seen and just not able to put things together," Begay said. "That's just how difficult this game is, even for a guy of his talent level."

Now on the tee ... Ray Halbritter! (Ray who?)Founding a PGA Tour event has its benefits. Just ask Ray Halbritter, the CEO of Turning Stone Resort & Casino and founder of the Turning Stone Resort Championship in upstate New York. Halbritter, 60, has awarded himself the ultimate perk: a spot in the field. No, not in the pro-am—in the actual tournament.
“I had a conversation with the people in charge — myself — and I got lucky and got approved to play,” Halbritter deadpanned, drawing laughter from the gathered media members. He then went on to explain how seriously hard he has worked to make his game respectable.
In 1999, when Halbritter opened Turning Stone’s first course, Sandstone Hollow, his handicap stood at between 15 or 16, putting him squarely in golf’s barely-above-average category. He had a nice short game but was plagued by a wicked slice.
“Over time, I got my handicap down to a 12, then a 7 and then to about a 2,” he said, explaining that he improved dramatically once acclaimed teacher Rick Smith, designer of Turning Stone’s Shenendoah course and former instructor for Phil Mickelson, helped him get rid of his banana ball.
No word yet on whether Halbritter has doctored his odds to win the tournament. But the 3-1 line Turning Stone is currently offering sounds a little favorable, no? Rain coming. Spackler says u should stay @ home… Shovels, rakes and … Twitter? Yep, seems golf course superintendents have added a new tool to their sheds: social networking, according to Brendan Prunty at The New Jersey Star-Ledger:
Between blogs, Twitter and Facebook, golf course superintendents have become as proficient using 140 characters to post a warning about a frost delay as they are at making sure the brown spot from 140 yards out is taken care of. “It’s a young man’s business,” said Ridgewood Country Club’s superintendent Todd Raisch. “It seems like everyone under 40 has a Facebook account and some with Twitter. But everyone is on some sort of social media it seems like, and it’s only going to continue to grow. Whether it’s a disease or an insect or weather, someone else will blog or Tweet about it and you can know about it before it gets to your place.”
Wait, I thought PDAs weren’t allowed on the golf course?

More From the Web
by Kevin Cunningham