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Vanity Fair ready to drop Tiger mistress bombshell

Vanity Fair,
the celebrity scandal glossy known for its Hollywood parties and
high-living editor, is now in the golf business. Just a couple months
after running an old Tiger Woods photo on its cover, Vanity Fair is
preparing what sounds like the definitive article on Woods's
mistresses, four of whom posed for the magazine. The title of the
article is "The Temptation of Tiger Woods." <
The full story isn't online, but VanityFair.com offers a preview (Warning: Link contains partial nudity), including these two revelations:

Woods
has said in recent interviews that no one in his inner circle knew
about his affairs, but Seal’s reporting contradicts that. Woods’s
mistress Jamie Jungers says, “Every time I would fly out to see [Tiger]
or schedule itineraries or anything, I would always go through Bryon
[Bell],” Woods’s childhood friend and the president of Tiger Woods
Design. (Bell did not respond to requests for comment.)
According to Woods’s mistress Mindy Lawton, when she alerted Tiger to the fact that The National Enquirer had caught on to their affair, he put her in contact with his agent,
Mark Steinberg, of IMG Worldwide. After Lawton explained to him what
had transpired (see below), Steinberg said, “We’ll take care of it.”
(Steinberg did not respond to requests for comment.)
ESPN to show Woods's first tee shot on Thursday, no matter what time The Masters famously broadcasts only from 4-7 p.m. EST on Thursdays, which The Daily Flog appreciates for letting us know when we should leave work. However, Augusta National has budged a bit and will allow ESPN to show Woods's first tee shot on Thursday no matter what time it is, according to The New York Times.
Depending on Woods’s tee time, it could be a long time before viewers
see anything else live, if at all. That is because the Masters has long
believed that less is more, so a lot of the action takes place before
live coverage starts.

If Woods tees off at 1:52 p.m. next Thursday, as he did in last year’s
first round, some of his shots will be seen live during ESPN’s 4 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Eastern time slot. If he has a morning tee time, like last
year’s 10:45 a.m. second-round time, nothing he does after his first
tee shot will be shown live.

Tee times will be announced Tuesday. 

Michelle Wie finds Stanford studies more interesting than Rules studies Can't say I blame her, but Paul Arnett of The Honolulu Star-Bulletin makes a compelling case that Wie's Rules gaffes have the potential to be historic in the wrong sort of way.

Four rules violations for Wie since turning pro
four-plus years ago is a lifetime's worth for most players competing at
the professional level.

There
is a theory among golf writers that Wie is a victim of the
step-skipping she did as a teenager. Instead of playing golf at the
junior, high school and collegiate levels where you learn the basic
rules of the game, Wie was busy going to and fro to events on the PGA
and LPGA tours, never taking the time to learn the playbook.

Wie has made it clear in the past that she doesn't lose much sleep over her Rules violations, which, in the case of her inadvertent grounding of her club in the hazard Sunday, can appear ridiculous, especially to a curious teenager. Wie didn't sound especially chastened on Monday either.

"People make mistakes, but you know what, that's
all in the past. You know, I really think that that's what happened,
and hopefully from now on it won't happen. But you know, I'm just
trying now to think about this week."

After
that response, a reporter asked, "May be a silly question, but now that
you have no studying to do for Stanford, will you take out the rules
book and look at it a little more or go over it, or is it one of those
things that you try not to think about as much?"

Classic
Wie answer: "Well, you know, this summer I am going to try to take some
online courses and try to transfer them in, so I'm not at Stanford for
10 years, so I want to try to study this summer, see where that takes
me."

Wie fans should also check out this charming New York Times article on Wie's interest in art. Of her paintings, which include bloody skulls and teddy-bear-mauling robots, Wie says, “It’s like drawings you do in fifth grade and someone says, ‘You need help.’ ”

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by Kevin Cunningham