Truth & Rumors: IBM CEO won't talk Augusta, Sutton says players 'selfish'

IBM CEO Virginia "Ginny" Rometty ducked a question about whether she was a member of historically male-only Augusta National Golf Club at a shareholder meeting Tuesday, according to Bloomberg News.
IBM is one of the sponsors of the Masters, held at Augusta National, where no woman is known to have been offered membership since its founding eight decades ago. Historically, the club has offered a membership to the CEO of IBM, allowing him to don the club's green member blazer.

"I'm certainly very happy about our CEO and be anxious to know if she's a member of Augusta?" the unidentified male shareholder asked at the meeting in North Charleston, South Carolina. "No response is required," he added.
Rometty, 54, didn't answer while the room was filled with laughter. Chairman Sam Palmisano, standing next to her on the stage, thanked the shareholder for the "very kind comment."
"We were all curious as to when that would come up," Palmisano said. "But thank you again. Can I have another question please?"
Hal Sutton says modern players are 'selfish'Hal Sutton, two-time PGA Championship winner and captain of the losing U.S. side at the 2004 Ryder Cup, said that today's players are selfish and that 2012 captain Davis Love's best bet is to "stay out of their way," according to USA Today.
"I don't know that guys are following anyone but their own selves today. We live in a pretty selfish world. It's not a criticism, in my mind that's a fact," said Sutton, the 2004 captain.
"In order to be a leader you've got to understand that from the beginning. These guys don't want to follow anybody. The hard part about being a captain is you're the greatest guy in the world if you win and did the worse job in the world if you lose and you never hit a shot. And with golf I think there's more to it than that."
The 2004 team lost to the Europeans 18 1/2 to 9 1/2. The competition is remembered for Sutton pairing Tiger Woods with Phil Mickelson.
Where have all the American women golfers gone?Sports Illustrated legend Frank Deford wonders what happened to women's golf in the United States in an NPR essay.
After all, at a time when U.S. women are succeeding so across the cultural spectrum, when more and more of our girls also grow up playing sports, it remains both an irony and a mystery why American female athletes are enjoying such little success in the popular international individual sports. Good grief, it if hadn't been for Lindsay Vonn skiing down the Alps ahead of everybody else this winter we'd never get a sports page headline, women's division.
The American failure in tennis and golf is especially curious because women's team sports receive commensurately so little notice in the United States and, consequently, the players receive so little remuneration compared with what male American team athletes make.
You'd expect, then, that the most promising American young female athletes would naturally migrate to individual sports, especially to tennis and golf, where the big money is made. But obviously this is not the case.
In tennis, Europeans dominate. In golf, Asians.
Dead whale had swallowed golf ballA whale found dead in Washington state had swallowed a golf ball, according to the Associated Press.
A gray whale found dead in Washington state's Puget Sound had been feeding on shrimp and also had some debris, including a golf ball, in its stomach, but scientists don't know what killed the animal
The stomach examination Monday found the shrimp, woody debris, algae, pieces of rope and plastic, the golf ball and some flat spongy material, NOAA Fisheries said.
The garbage was minimal and not the cause of death, which remains under investigation with tissue tests, spokesman Brian Gorman said. It's common for whales to pick up debris near urban areas because they are filter feeders. There were no signs of trauma or entanglement on the whale, he said.
No Seinfeld jokes, please. It's too soon. Tweet of the Day

More From the Web
by Kevin Cunningham