Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Keegan Bradley took to Twitter to perform some damage control after this weekend's Northern Trust Open. No, Bradley did not apologize for his performance after losing to Bill Haas in a thrilling three-way playoff. Instead, Bradley said he was sorry for spitting on the course. Tweet1 Bradley, the 26-year-old who won the PGA Championship as a rookie last year, is often seen on television spitting on the course, which caught the eye of British golf instructor and TV commentator Denis Pugh as he watched the Northern Trust Open. Pugh also noticed Bradley's geological pace of play. Tweet2But Pugh didn't stop there. He asked his more than 7,000 followers to send tweets to Bradley and Bradley's sponsor Cleveland Golf to complain about the spitting and slow play. Tweet3 Tweet4 Clearly, Pugh's message was heard. Afterward, Pugh accepted Bradley's apology although he noted that it covered only spitting, not pace of play. Tweet5 Tweet6 Of course, Bradley is not the only member of the PGA Tour who spits on the course. Tiger Woods is often criticized for spitting on the golf course. Back in 2008, our former colleague Farrell Evans weighed in on this issue, concluding that the problem wasn't that Woods spits on the course, but it was the way he spits.  

A good Southern man should never chew gum in public, but spitting is permissible just as long as it's not on the town square sidewalk or near a lady.
Tiger is not a good practitioner of the art of spitting. The saliva must come out of the mouth in a tight rope. Tiger’s tends to come out like a water hose meant to wet the widest space possible. Also, he’s just not a spitting type of guy. What do I mean? He’s a golfer from Southern California, not Salinas or Sacramento or Selma or San Antonio.
Boo Weekley is good at it because he knows the context of spitting. He knows the history and has seen good men, hardworking men, perform one of the working man’s greatest crafts.
It's a skill that was perfected by real country folks, working-class poor people who lived through the Depression. They spit, but they knew good manners. A kind word and a handshake and opening doors for women and old folks. Yes sir and no sir. Ask a man about his day, and he told you about how grateful he was that he could support his family and that there was good rain last night.
For these people, spitting was a ritual, a way to pause between parts of a story. I call it fluid punctuation.
Ben Crane mannequin stops burglary in Denmark
USA Today has the details
A mannequin of Crane holding a golf club thwarted a late-night robbery Feb. 17 in the Copenhagen, Denmark, headquarters of Show Me Golfers, a golf app that Crane endorses. According to ShowMeGolfers, the burlgar(s) broke a window to gain entry but did not take anything, fleeing at the shadowy image of Crane. The alarm, however, went off, and upon arriving at the scene, police officers pulled their guns on the Crane lookalike and asked him to drop his gun before realizing it was a mannequin.
No one — not even the mannequin — was hurt in the incident.
"I am pumped. This is awesome," Crane enthusiastically said Monday at the World Golf Championship-Accenture Match Play Championship. "It's weird, I'll tell you that. But it's great news. And I technically saved a major robbery. When the cops got there, they soon realized I had it all under control."
Michelle Wie goes gluten-free to improve golf game
according to AFP
"I heard that story that he turned gluten free and became number one in the world," Wie on Tuesday told a press conference in Singapore ahead of the $1.4-million HSBC Women's Champions tournament starting Thursday where she will be competing.
"I think it's really motivating me," she said in response to a question from AFP. Djokovic, who has battled allergies in his career, has credited a gluten-free diet as one of the key reasons behind his surge to the top of men's tennis.
Like the Serbian, Wie is also allergy-prone and has tweeted earlier this month that her hands are less swollen after omitting gluten from her diet.
"I am allergic to everything in this world, I don't really digest food very well," the 22-year-old Hawaiian of Korean descent said. "So I just thought maybe if I cut out gluten, I can feel better because I heard that it causes inflammation, everything... but it's been week three and I feel a big difference."
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