Truth & Rumors: Tiger shows good form at Tavistock

Sure it’s just an exhibition of multimillionaires playing their home courses in gated communities, but that doesn’t mean the Tavistock Cup is meaningless, especially for Tiger Woods who is trying to get a new swing in championship form before next month’s Masters Tournament. Butch Harmon told Golf365.com that if Woods didn’t play well at a relaxed event like Tavistock, then his former student might have “real problems.”
Fortunately for Woods then, he played well in Day 1 of the Tavistock Cup in Orlando on Monday, according to All Headline News.

The most scrutinized swing in golf was on display once again Monday at the Tavistock Cup matches and Tiger Woods had a relaxing day on his home course.
Woods, playing for the Isleworth team, combined with Arjun Atwal for an eight-under par round of 64 at Isleworth Country Club that helped his team take the first round lead at 30-under par. “It’s getting better,” Woods after his latest outing.
“It’s starting to feel a lot better, more consistent. It’s getting a grasp and understanding what the fixes are,” Woods said of his ongoing swing reconstruction.
Woods played well most of the day. He drove the 349-yard par fourth 16th with a three-wood and two-putted for one of his birdies.
Now if he can just beat Jimmy Fallon at miniature golf... Is Padraig Harrington ready to reap benefits of swing change? As a multiple major winner working on a swing change in his 30s, Padraig Harrington doesn’t get the same attention as Tiger Woods, but The Irish Independent’s Karl McGinty reports that despite a water ball that derailed his chances at Doral on Sunday, Harrington’s gambles are starting to pay off:
From Tiger down, they gamble on swing changes. In Harrington's case it was initially prompted by a combination of a nightmare final tee shot at Oakland Hills, the desire to exert less wear and tear on his body and to gain length.
The decision to invest $2m (€1.4m) in a G3 jet and stump up more than that each year to employ two pilots and to fuel, park and maintain it is another carefully considered gamble. It gives Harrington (39) the chance to play more, spend more time with his young family and relieve the stress of long-haul travel. It could stretch his career.
Harrington felt neither good nor bad about his final-round 73 on Sunday, but as those swing changes bed in, he at least joined the high-rollers once again on Sunday at a World Golf Championship, albeit briefly.
Might there be light at the end of a long dark tunnel?
Ryder Cup pays off for Wales tourism Last fall Wales hosted one of the more memorable—if waterlogged—Ryder Cups in recent memory, and since then golf fans have been trekking to Wales to try the courses for themselves, according to Wales Online.
The Ryder Cup effect saw the economic impact of golfing holidays in Wales reach almost £42m [US $67 million] last year, figures published yesterday show.
The increase of 21% over the previous year came at a time when total rounds played across the UK as a whole decreased by 5.3%.
Heritage Minister Alun Ffred Jones attributed the large rise to Wales’ successful hosting of last year’s Ryder Cup, saying the globally-viewed event at Newport’s Celtic Manor had been “fantastic for raising the profile of Wales to an international audience.”
Tweet of the Day Tn_bigger AlanShipnuck Uh, Paula, he's the one who should be nervous! RT @ThePCreamer @Graeme_McDowell too nervous to say hi tonite at the party but I'm a big fan!

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