Thursday, April 01, 2010

Alex Miceli of GolfWeek has a good scoop regarding the video distribution of Tiger Woods' Monday press conference at the Masters this Monday.

In an agreement drafted by Augusta National, the club said it will provide a feed of the April 5 press conference free of charge, but limits its use after the live broadcast to 48 hours after the press conference. During those 48 hours the press conference cannot be rebroadcast in its entirety, the use is limited to regularly scheduled sports or news programs and cannot be in excess of three minutes.

After the 48 hours the video cannot be rebroadcast at all without the written permission of Augusta National.

I don't know about you guys, but this sounds pretty fair to me. If you're obsessed with Woods and are going to treat the video from this Q&A like the Zapruder film, then you'll have YouTube. If you consider the transcript of a Woods press conference a good substitute for Ambien, then you can get your Tiger soundbites ("private matter," "police report," "no PEDs," "core values") on SportsCenter and go right back to Opening Day baseball highlights.

British bookmakers offer stupid Woods bets Every year, bookmakers from the UK post ridiculous proposition bets to get media attention and every year a gullible U.S. publication falls for it. The year's victim is The Associated Press, which reported that British bookmakers are offering wild prop bets on Tiger Woods's return at next week's Masters.

Forget about simply betting on Tiger Woods to win the Masters, British bookmakers are taking wagers on whether the No. 1 player in the world will hit a tree on his first drive or if he’ll kiss an anonymous blond before teeing off.

Think about it. If this was a legitimate bet, then why wouldn't Tiger Woods tell his pal Byron Bell, "Hey, you should fly to London and bet $10,000 on me not kissing an anonymous blonde before the Masters." These bets come with all sorts of restrictions and are just posted to get people through the door. It's a con.

Dr. J's Atlanta golf course in foreclosure Julius Erving's Atlanta golf course, which he purchased in 2007, is in serious financial trouble, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Although there is still a chance the bank and Erving could work out a deal, [his attorney Dorna] Taylor doesn't think that's likely. Instead, the entire episode will serve as a learning experience.

Erving isn't done with golf, his attorney said.

"He has a plan to develop seven courses throughout the world," Taylor said. "He's definitely not quitting."

Incidentally, the former 76er great does not publicly talk about his handicap, at least in the many stories about Erving and golf I found. Larry Bird is a 5.

You May Like

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN