Al Geiberger: 'Call me Mr. 2' after albatross

Geiberger-albatross SAVANNAH, Ga. - Al "Albatross" Geiberger held up his scorecard for photographers this afternoon, pointing his left index finger at the "2" in the little box for Savannah Harbor Resort's par-5 11th hole. "The last time I posed with a scorecard," he said with a smile, "was when I shot 59."That was 33 years ago when Geiberger, playing in the 1977 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic, became the first player to break 60 in a PGA Tour event. Known ever since as "Mr. 59," Geiberger's license plates, phone numbers and e-mail addresses have all contained the two-digit eponym.
Now he's "Mr. 2."
Teamed with Jimmy Powell in the final round of the 70-and-older Demaret Division at the Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf, Geiberger made his double-eagle from the right rough using a hybrid club. "He had 175 to the front, 195 to the hole," said his caddie, Van Costa. "He was going to hit 4-iron. Then he said, 'No, let's try something with the rescue.'" Geiberger didn't know that his ball had plunked the pin and dropped until opponent Lee Trevino yelled, "It went in!"
Albatrosses are much rarer than holes-in-one, but Geiberger pulled off an ever more memorable one at the 1999 Novell Utah Showdown. That one stands out, he said this afternoon, because it happened on the same day his son Brent won his first PGA Tour event, the Canon Greater Hartford Open.
"I'm not playing any more," said Geiberger, who had knee-replacement surgery six months ago. "I watch guys on TV and say, 'I guess I did that once.'"
Geiberger's peers aren't so quick to consign him to the Barcalounger. Walking off the 11th green after making birdie, Trevino cracked, "Fours are no good in a game of twos, baby!" (Photo by David Walberg/SI)

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by Kevin Cunningham