Forget Orlando, smart PGA Tour pros live in Scottsdale

You'll hear a lot next week about the many Tour pros that call Orlando
home (Tiger Woods, Ernie Els and Trevor Immelman) as the locals play in
the Tavistock Cup, which pits Isleworth Country Club against neighboring Lake Nona Country Club. It's easy to understand why Tour pros like Orlando
(no state income tax, nice weather, good transportation, private gated
communities for the super-wealthy, no state income tax), but the smart
guys are in Scottsdale, Ariz. Whisper Rock club members (Geoff
Ogilvy, Paul Casey and Aaron Baddeley) would probably welcome a shot at
the Tavistock Cup winner. Phil Mickelson's a Whisper Rock member too,
though he now call Rancho Sante Fe -- north of San Diego -- home.***
spent time in both Orlando and Scottsdale this winter, I can say without question
that if I were a wealthy tour pro, Best Buy would be delivering my 103-inch plasma TVs to Scottsdale. Orlando is a great place, if you're
a 10-year-old, but Scottsdale has nicer restaurants, better
nightlife and a much higher concentration of beautiful women. It's
really one of the country's hot-chick meccas, along with Miami, Los
Angeles and certain areas of Manhattan. Don't believe me? Just ask Paul
Casey, who explained his own move to Scottsdale from the UK -- a hot
chick dead zone if there ever was one -- at a news conference Wednesday. I felt very lucky to eventually end up at [Arizona State University], which is a long story, which we won't get into. But there were a few friends of mine who had played college golf. One
of them said that Scottsdale was the greatest place he had ever been,
which eventually I got the chance to visit it; I could see why, for the
golf, the weather and all of the other assets. (Laughter) What? I said
Rancho Sante Fe-Del Mar region of Southern California, where Phil lives,
is one of the nicest places I've ever seen, but Phil pays a premium to
live there. California's state income tax for earnings of more than $40,346 is 9.3 percent. Arizona residents are taxed 5.03 percent on income of more than $150,000.

More From the Web
by Kevin Cunningham