New Year, New Game: Fix Your Chicken Wing for a High Draw

It can be hard to tell when you let your left arm fly away from your body in the swing. To get the feeling for a proper left-arm position, hold your left elbow in place with your right hand as you make left-arm-only practice swings.
Graham Gaches

The New Year is nearly upon us, so it’s time to start thinking about golf for 2017. We’ve assembled some basic tips to serve as a New Year’s Resolution for each facet of your game.

If your misses are a never-ending parade of slices and thin shots, it's a good bet that your left elbow is bending too much at impact and into the follow-through. This, in turn, causes your left arm to fly away from your body, creating an undesirable position that closely resembles the galline anatomical feature for which it is named: the chicken wing.

To fix this mistake, grip your driver with your left hand only and set the back of your right hand behind your left elbow, at the base of your tricep muscle. Make a couple of easy swings with your left arm back and through, applying pressure to your elbow with your right hand. As you swing through, notice how the left elbow turns down and doesn't fold out. Repeat this drill several times before teeing off, then try to re-create in your full swing the same feeling of turning your left elbow toward the ground. Not only will that chicken wing fly the coop, that slice of yours should straighten out—and maybe even turn into a powerful draw.

It can be hard to tell when you let your left arm fly away from your body in the swing. To get the feeling for a proper left-arm position, hold your left elbow in place with your right hand as you make left-arm-only practice swings.
Graham Gaches

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