Instruction

Drop Anchor: Alternatives to an Anchored Putting Stroke

How To Survive The Anchoring Ban
If you've had success with the long putter or belly putter like Keegan Bradley, Top 100 Teacher Brian Manzella shows you the adjustments you need to make to use the same putter under the anchoring ban and get the same results.

Come 2016, Rule 14-1b will prohibit anchoring the club during the stroke. Climb back in off the ledge, people! There are work-arounds. (Here at GOLF, we don't call them "hacks.") Hey, history is hardly littered with brilliant broom-sweepers, so think of this not as the end but as the beginning of a brand-new you on the greens.

1. GET ON POINT

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Anchoring made the top of the pendulum a fixed point. In any good stroke, the putter’s butt end points at the same spot throughout. So in your setup, imagine that the shaft extends upward; wherever it hits your body becomes the virtual anchor point. Now swing the putter such that the butt end is always pointed at that starting spot.

2. GET ‘CROSS’ FIT

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The main benefits of anchoring? Taking the hands out of the stroke and staying stable through impact. This variation on a cross-handed stroke can produce real advantages. Set the fingers of the right hand against the lower part of the left forearm. Play around with ball position until you find something comfortable, probably farther forward in your stance.

3. BE A WEAK-LING

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Clamp your right fingers on your left forearm (but make sure the club is not anchored above your forearm). Slightly weakening your left-hand grip often improves both feel and results for my students. Start by playing the ball near your front foot.

4. TRY THE CLAW

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Everyday players can struggle with the right hand taking over. Try this cross-handed claw grip, which keeps the right hand and wrist quiet, leading to consistent contact.

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