Instruction

Brooke Henderson's Four Keys to Laser-Like Approaches

Photo: Getty Images

Brooke Henderson won the LPGA Championship in 2016 at just 18 years old.

The Canadian phenom leads the LPGA Tour with 254 birdies. Her secret? Laser-like approach shots. Copy the teen sensation's four main moves -- then go knock down the flag!

1. ROLL WITH THE PUNCHES

Notice the position of the clubhead -- the toe has rotated well past the heel. Releasing the club like this through impact gives you maximum power and speed, in addition to a little draw spin. Be like Brooke -- roll your right forearm and wrist over their left-side counterparts through the hitting zone and beyond.

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ROLL WITH THE PUNCHES

2. SEE THE BALL

Brooke's eyes help her hit approach shots that never leave the flag. After visualizing the shape she wants in her pre-shot routine, she locks onto the ball as she settles into her stance. Then, as seen here, she stays focused on the ball well after impact, rotating her head in sync with her swing so her eyes can "chase" the ball down the fairway. This subtle move makes it easy to fully finish your swing.
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SEE THE BALL

3. BECOME A "CHOKE" ARTIST

She typically chokes down an inch or two on the club; it's how she controls it from start to finish. Give it a try -- a "shorter" iron is easier to manage. Also, copy the way she wraps her right forefinger around the handle. This simple tweak stabilizes the club through the hitting zone, letting you squeeze every yard possible out of the speed you created.
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BECOME A "CHOKE" ARTIST

4. BUILD A POWER PLANT

Brooke's swing stands out -- she rotates like crazy but with both feet planted in the turf. Maintaining your connection to the ground sends power up from your shoes to your arms, hands and the clubhead. So stop lifting or rolling your heels through impact. "Quiet" footwork will make a loud noise on your card.
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BUILD A POWER PLANT

73.6

Henderson's GIR percentage on the 2016 LPGA Tour, good for eighth. During the final round of the LPGA Championship, she missed only four greens. At 18, she became the second-youngest major winner ever.

 

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