For all your short-game shots—from partial wedges to chips—shorten your left thumb and rotate your hand counterclockwise (to the left as you look down at your hands) so that no more than two knuckles are visible at address.
Graham Gaches
By GOLF WIRE
Friday, February 16, 2018

The fundamentals that help you hit the long ball can give you fits around the green. Consider your grip: A strong left-hand position encourages a deep and full wrist cock and a powerful delayed release. But chips and pitches require fewer moving parts, and that mobility in your wrists can make it tough to control the clubface.

Try using a "weaker" left-hand position. For all your short-game shots—from partial wedges to chips—shorten your left thumb and rotate your hand counterclockwise (to the left as you look down at your hands) so that no more than two knuckles are visible at address. A weaker grip adds stability to your left wrist so that the club, hands and arms swing as one unit. Plus, with the back of your left hand facing the target, it's easy to deliver a square clubface at impact.

To simplify your chipping motion for more consistency, shorten your left thumb on the grip, rotate your left hand farther left (so that only two knuckles are visible), and make sure that the back of your left hand faces the target after impact.

Graham Gaches

 

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