All the New Clubs That Hit Shelves Today -- September 19, 2014

Tuesday September 23rd, 2014

Mizuno, one of the marquee names in irons, is rolling out four models with one goal: to reestablish itself as an undisputed iron authority for golfers of all skill levels. The company’s MP irons, for highly skilled players, are widely regarded as some of the sweetest-feeling, best-looking sticks around, while the “game-improvement” JPX family does a great job serving the needs of the average Joe.

Mizuno’s appeal can be traced largely to its robust fitting program. Custom orders make up 75 percent of the company’s iron sales, and Mizuno builds and ships your new irons within 48 hours of receiving the specs. This fall, the company is adding 26 shaft options to the 54 already available, and it’s waiving the upcharge for premium steel shafts on custom orders. So there’s no reason not to build sticks that fit you to a tee.

Here’s what’s hitting store shelves today…

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons
Price: $999, steel; $1,099, graphite

The JPX 850 Forged, which targets 6- to 16-handicappers, features a new material called 1025MCS boron. While 1025E carbon steel is a proven winner that delivers a great-feeling forged iron, adding boron to the mix creates an alloy that’s 30 percent stronger. This means the head can be forged with a thinner face and deeper cavity. The result: added face flex and longer, more consistent distance. Company tests show 3 percent faster ball speeds, which adds up to as much as one full club. The construction saves weight, too, letting Mizuno move an extra 20 grams to the perimeter. This creates a 5 percent higher MOI than in its predecessor, the JPX 825 Pro.

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons
Michael Chini
Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons


Mizuno JPX-850 Irons
Price: $799, steel; $899, graphite

The JPX 850 packs a bigger punch, generating 3 percent faster ball speeds—a half club’s worth of distance or more—than the JPX 850 Forged. Designed for 10- to 25-handicappers, the cast stainless steel head has a lively, thin face and undercuts in the sole and topline to increase face flex—the company claims it registers a 0.83 COR, making it as hot as legally possible for drivers. A reengineered cavity moves mass lower, farther back and more central than in its forerunner, the JPX 825, which expands the hitting area. Plus, the reinforced topline and cavity badge help control feel and sound.

Mizuno JPX-850 Irons
Michael Chini
Mizuno JPX-850 Irons


Mizuno MP-15 Irons
Price: $999, steel; $1,099 graphite

The company’s MP irons remain the embodiment of tradition, with the slick look and sweet feel that advanced players crave. The new MP-15, for 0- to 8-handicappers, is engineered to provide more forgiveness than the half-cavity MP-59 and more maneuverability than the blade-like MP-64. This happy medium comes from its forged 1025E carbon steel head, which has a large recessed area behind the sweet spot that’s filled with lightweight titanium. Swapping carbon steel for titanium allows Mizuno to shift 28 extra grams to the perimeter for more help on misses, while an updated CG location allows for improved ball control. More mass high in the face gives this multimaterial head a feel similar to Mizuno’s one-piece “grain flow” forgings. As for head size, the long irons are similar to the MP-59, while the scoring clubs are in line with the MP-64. The sole—identical to the MP-64’s—has a rounded leading edge and a rolled trailing edge.

Mizuno MP-15 Irons
Michael Chini
Mizuno MP-15 Irons


Mizuno MP-H5 Irons
Price: $1,099, graphite

The MP-H5, for 0- to 16-handicappers, is best for players one step removed from the JPX line. It’s built to hit high, long shots that land softly. The 3- to 6-irons have stainless steel bodies, powerful maraging steel face inserts (the 4-iron produces a 0.81 COR), and wide soles for a low, deep CG. By design, they launch shots at a similar height with less spin than the larger MP-H4 they replace. MP-H5 short irons (7-PW) have forged carbon steel bodies with stainless steel back weights. Unlike previous MP short irons, these are hollow for more consistent CG depth and steadier performance throughout the set.

Mizuno MP-H5 Irons
Michael Chini
Mizuno MP-H5 Irons


Mizuno MP-T5 Wedge
Price: $130, steel; $143, graphite

One knock against Mizuno wedges in the recent past has been the lack of loft/bounce options to choose from. That’s no longer the case with the debut of the MP-T5 series. You can choose from 25 loft/bounce combos, including five Gap wedges between 49° and 53°, a total of 10 sand wedges between 54° and 58° (in high or low bounce) and 10 lob wedges between 58° and 62°(in high or low bounce). In addition, each loft has a corresponding sole grind. For instance, the Gap wedges have a soft trailing edge grind so more of the sole is exposed on full swings, the high-bounce sand wedges have a soft trailing edge and soft heel grind, the low-bounce sand wedges have an aggressive C-grind with more mass removed from the heel and toe, and so on. Besides that, the “Quad Cut” grooves (same as in the MP-T4 series) are tailored to specific lofts. The 49° to 53° heads have grooves that are narrower and deeper to maximize spin and control on full shots, whereas the 54° to 62° have wider, shallower grooves for partial shots. The company’s Shaft Optimizer software helps club fitters to make recommendations for you based on loft or distance gapping. The “grain flow forged” carbon steel MP-T5 wedges come in choice of two finishes: White Satin or Black Ion.

Mizuno MP-T5 Wedge
Courtesy of Mizuno
Mizuno MP-T5 Wedge

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