Adidas Apparel Goes on Extreme Tour

In what sounds like a dream golf assignment, two near-scratch players are being sent around the world this winter to courses with extremely hot weather to test clothing made by TaylorMade-adidas.
The "Wear in the World" tour, announced with some fanfare at the Adidas Golf headquarters in Carlsbad, Calif., this week, will transport Lindsay Knowlton (3 handicap) and Josh Sullivan (1) to golf courses in Death Valley, the tip of South Africa, the southernmost part of Argentina, equatorial Bolivia, and Alice Springs, Australia—the world's hottest golf course, with temperatures reaching 122 degrees—to see if Adidas' various proprietary fabrics can, well, take the heat.
So much of contemporary golf enterprise is devoted to keeping the player absolutely dry and sweat-free during a round. Apparently Adidas willl go to hell and back to prove it. Adidas makes golf clothes with all kinds of high-technology bells and whistles, including the ClimaCool, ClimaLite and ClimaProof fabrics, which use lightweight, breathable CoolMax fibers to keep players cool and dry. The plan is to use different fabric applications for different micro environments; for instance, at super-dry Furnace Creek, in Death Valley, 214 feet below sea level, the players will don ClimaCool, with its mesh ventilation; at Bolivia's LaPaz Golf Club, altitude 10,800 feet, they will wear ClimaLite and FORMOTION, which includes outerwear with almost no friction or restriction; at Walker Bay in South Africa, they will put on ClimaProof, a highly weather-resistant fabric, because that resort presumably has some wind and moisture. And so on.
In addition to their promotional activities, the players will teach golf to locals, mountain bike on Bolivia's "Death Road," and go cage diving with sharks off the coast of South Africa. In case you're interested (and should they survive), they will be blogging about their adventures at wearintheworld.adidasgolf.com and Golf.com, as well as filing Twitter and Facebook updates. -- Woody Hochswender, Contributing Style Editor, GOLF Magazine

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