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Kerr, Pressel give U.S. success in majors

Six South Koreans finished in the top 10, compared to two Americans — Kerr and Pressel. Leading the way was Se Ri Pak, the godmother of golf in her country. Pak was the only South Korean on the LPGA Tour in 1998 when she won the LPGA Championship and U.S. Women's Open as a rookie. Now there are 44.

That list doesn't include Brazilian-born Angela Park, the first-round leader at the McDonald's LPGA Championship who made it through 36 holes atop the leaderboard at Pine Needles and tied for second.

In-Bee Park, a former U.S. Junior Girls champion, was among five players who finished under par at Pine Needles.

One shot behind in sixth place was Ji-Yai Shin, who has been crushing her competition on the Korean LPGA and was one shot out of the lead on the back nine Sunday. It was only her third time on the LPGA Tour, but she has been tested off the golf course. Shin's mother was killed in an accident while taking a younger brother and sister to a birthday party. Shin spent a year sleeping in the hospital to be with them while they recovered. Now No. 11 in the world ranking, Shin looks as though she belongs there.

Jee Young Lee played the first two rounds with Juli Inkster and showed plenty of pop in her swing. She won the LPGA Tour event in South Korea in 2005, one year after turning pro.

And don't forget what happened three weeks ago at the LPGA Championship.

The 54-hole leader was Na On Min, an 18-year-old who was playing in her first major and only her sixth tournament as a professional. She made three straight birdies on the back nine to finish alone in third.

Ochoa, of course, continues to be the class of the LPGA Tour, even though she hasn't won a major. She already has won three times this year to rise to No. 1 in the world. Although her drought is now 0-for-23 in the majors, Ochoa wasn't worried. Few players under such pressure to win a major have handled defeat with such peace and dignity.

"That's the way I am," she said. "There are times when I will really either just be sad or upset. It really hurts when I don't win. But at the same time, it's just life. I'm going to go home now and have a good time with my family, my friends. They came here, and I have no reason to be upset and cry in my room."

The aberration last week was Suzann Pettersen of Norway, who probably should have won the first two majors but settled for the LPGA Championship. She was 7 over through the first six holes and played the next 30 in even par to miss the cut by one.

Ditto for Karrie Webb of Australia, who was closing in on Ochoa's No. 1 ranking a month ago, but shot 83 at Pine Needles.

Americans no longer dominate the LPGA Tour and probably never will again. The LPGA Tour is too successful and attracts the best players from every corner of the globe. It's no longer a fair fight. Pressel and Kerr did their part, winning two of the first three majors this year.

What they could use are some reinforcements with ribbons in their hair.

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